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Multiplatform Definition

Multiplatform Definition

If a software program is developed for mulitple operating systems, it is considered to be “multiplatform.” Since Microsoft Word runs on both the Windows and Macintosh platform, it is a mutliplatform application.

In the consumer gaming market, mutliplatform games run on more than one gaming machine. For example, a sports game developed for Xbox, Playstation, GameCube, and PC would be a multiplatform game. If a game is developed exclusively for one system, i.e. “The Legend of Zelda,” for Nintendo, it is not multiplatform. Gaming hardware manufacturers use exclusive software as a reason for consumers to buy their system.

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Swipe Definition

Swipe Definition

Swipe is a command used primarily with touchscreen devices, such as smartphones and tablets. It is also supported by some laptops with trackpads and desktop computers with trackpad input.

A swipe involves quickly moving (or “swiping”) your finger across a touchscreen or trackpad. For example, swiping the screen from right to left in a photo viewing application typically displays the next photo. While browsing multiple photos, swiping up or down may allow you scroll through the photo library. Most smartphones also allow you to swipe left or right to switch between home screens.

Devices that support multi-touch may allow you to swipe with multiple fingers to perform different functions. For example, MacBook users can swipe left or right with two fingers to perform the Back or Forward command in a web browser. Swiping up or down with three fingers performs the Exposé command in Mac OS X.

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SMS Definition

SMS Definition

Stands for “Short Message Service.” SMS is used to send text messages to mobile phones. The messages can typically be up to 160 characters in length, though some services use 5-bit mode, which supports 224 characters. SMS was originally created for phones that use GSM (Global System for Mobile) communication, but now all the major cell phone systems support it.

While SMS is most commonly used for text messaging between friends or co-workers, it has several other uses as well. For example, subscription SMS services can transmit weather, news, sports updates, and stock quotes to users’ phones. SMS can also notify employees of sales inquiries, service stops, and other information pertinent to their business. Doctors can receive SMS messages regarding patient emergencies.

Fortunately, text messages sent via SMS do not require the recipient’s phone to be on in order for the message to be successfully transmitted. The SMS service will hold the message until the recipient turns on his or her phone, at which point the message will be be sent to the recipient’s phone. Most cell phone companies allow you to send a certain number of text messages every month for no charge. Though it would be a good idea to find out what that number is before you go text message crazy.

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Dynamic Website Definition

Dynamic Website Definition

Dynamic websites contain Web pages that are generated in real-time. These pages include Web scripting code, such as PHP or ASP. When a dynamic page is accessed, the code within the page is parsed on the Web server and the resulting HTML is sent to the client’s Web browser.

Most large websites are dynamic, since they are easier to maintain than static websites. This is because static pages each contain unique content, meaning they must be manually opened, edited, and published whenever a change is made. Dynamic pages, on the other hand, access information from a database. Therefore, to alter the content of a dynamic page, the webmaster may only need to update a database record. This is especially helpful for large sites that contain hundreds or thousands of pages. It also makes it possible for multiple users to update the content of a website without editing the layout of the pages.

Dynamic websites that access information from a database are also called database-driven websites.

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IMEI Definition

IMEI Definition

Stands for “International Mobile Equipment Identity.” Every mobile device that connects to a cellular network has a unique IMEI number. This includes cell phones, smartphones, cellular-enabled tablets and smartwatches, and other devices that support cellular data.

The IMEI number uniquely identifies a mobile device. It is separate from the SIM card or UICC number which is linked to a removable card in the device. This means the IMEI can be used to track or locate a specific device, regardless of what card is installed in it. For example, if your phone is stolen and the SIM card is swapped out, your mobile provider can still block access from the stolen phone using the IMEI.

Difference Between the IMEI and Serial Number

An IMEI is similar to a serial number since it is a unique number linked to a hardware device. While serial numbers are generated by the manufacturer, IMEI numbers are produced by the GSMA (Groupe Spéciale Mobile Association), an international organization that oversees mobile network operators. The GSMA provides each mobile device manufacturer with a range of numbers to use for IMEIs on devices the produce.

Manufacturers can choose their own convention for serial numbers, including the length and type of characters (numeric or alphanumeric). IMEI numbers are always 15 digits long, comprised of a 14-digit unique number followed by a “check digit” (or a checksum), which validates the number. A variation of the IMEI, called the IMEISV (IMEI Software Version), includes the 14-digit number plus two digits for the version of the device’s software. The IMEISV may change after a software update.

NOTE: Most smartphones allow you to view your device’s IMEI in the “About” section of the device settings. Another way to view the IMEI is to press *#06# on the numeric keypad.

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HDMI Definition

HDMI Definition

Stands for “High-Definition Multimedia Interface.” HDMI is a trademark and brand name for a digital interface used to transmit audio and video data in a single cable. It is supported by modern audio/video equipment, such as 4K televisions, HDTVs, audio receivers, DVD and Blu-ray players, cable boxes, and video game consoles.

While other types of A/V connections require separate cables for audio and video data, a single HDMI cable carries the audio and video streams together, eliminating cable clutter. For example, an analog component cable connection requires three cables for video and two for audio, totaling five cables in all. The same information can be transmitted digitally using one HDMI cable.

Because HDMI is a digital connection, HDMI cables are less prone to interference and signal noise than analog cables. Also, since most components, such as DVD players and digital cable boxes process information digitally, HDMI eliminates the digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital conversion other interfaces require. Therefore, HDMI typically produces the best quality picture and sound compared to other types of connections.

HDMI cables are often more expensive than analog cables since they cost more to manufacture. But it is important to remember that a single HDMI cable can replace multiple analog cables. The single all-purpose connection simplifies setup and makes it easy to connect and disconnect devices. It also supports digital commands, allowing devices to communicate with each other. For example, if your TV is connected via HDMI to a receiver, the TV can automatically turn the receiver on and off when the TV is turned on and off. It can also synchronize the volume between the TV and receiver. Modern HDMI receivers allow you to visually configure the receiver settings using your TV as the interface.

NOTE: HDMI is a trademark owned by HDMI Licensing Administrator, Inc. (HDMI LA) that serves as an indicator of source for HDMI LA’s brand of digital interfaces used to connect high-definition equipment. More information is available at HDMI.org.

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Processor Core Definition

Processor Core Definition

A processor core (or simply “core”) is an individual processor within a CPU. Many computers today have multi-core processors, meaning the CPU contains more than one core.

For many years, computer CPUs only had a single core. In the early 2000s, as processor clock speeds began plateauing, CPU manufacturers needed to find other ways to increase processing performance. Initially, they achieved this by putting multiple processors in high-end computers. While this was effective, it added significant cost to the computers and the multiprocessing performance was limited by the bus speed between the CPUs.

By combining processors on a single chip, CPU manufactures were able to increase performance more efficiently at a lower cost. The individual processing units became known as “cores” rather than processors. In the mid-2000s, dual-core and quad-core CPUs began replacing multi-processor configurations. While initially only high-end computers contained multiple cores, today nearly all PCs have multi-core processors.

NOTE: “Core” is also the name of Intel’s processor line, which replaced the Pentium lineup in 2006. Examples of Intel Core processors include the Core Duo, Core 2, Core i3, Core i5, and Core i7.

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External Hard Drive Definition

External Hard Drive Definition

Nearly all personal computers come with an internal hard drive. This drive stores the computer’s operating system, programs, and other files. For most users, the internal hard drive provides enough disk space to store all the programs and files. However, if the internal hard drive becomes full or if the user wants to back up the data on the internal hard drive, and external hard drive may be useful.

External hard drives typically have one of two interfaces – USB or Firewire. USB hard drives commonly use the USB 2.0 interface because it supports data transfer rates of up to 480 Mbps. USB 1.1 only supports transfers of up to 12 Mbps, which would make the hard drive seem slow to even the most patient people. Firewire drives may use either Firewire 400 or Firewire 800, which support data transfer rates of up to 400 and 800 Mbps respectively.

The most likely users to need external hard drives are those who do audio and video editing. This is because high-quality media files can fill up even the largest hard drives. Fortunately, external hard drives can be daisy chained, which means they can be connected one after the other and be used at the same time. This allows for virtually unlimited amounts storage.

Users who do not require extra storage may still find external hard drives useful for backing up their main hard drive. External hard drives are a great backup solution because they can store an exact copy of another hard drive and can be stored in a safe location. Using the drive to restore data or perform another backup is as simple as connecting it to the computer and dragging the necessary files from one drive to another.

While most external hard drives come in heavy, protective cases, some hard drives are designed primarily for portability. These drives usually don’t hold as much data as their larger desktop counterparts, but they have a sleek form factor and can easily be transported with a laptop computer. Some portable drives also include security features such as fingerprint recognition that prevent other people from accessing data on the drive in case it is lost.

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IP Definition

IP Definition

Stands for “Internet Protocol.” IP provides a standard set of rules for sending and receiving data over the Internet. It allows devices running on different platforms to communicate with each other as long as they are connected to the Internet.

In order for a Internet-connected host to be recognized by other devices, it must have an IP address. This may be either an IPv4 or IPv6 address, but either way it uniquely defines a device on the Internet.

The Internet Protocol also provides basic instructions for transferring packets between devices. However, it does not actually establish the connection or define the ordering of the packets transmitted. These aspects are handled by the Transmission Control Protocol, which works in conjunction with the Internet Protocol to transfer data between systems on the Internet. For this reason, connections between Internet-connected systems are often called “TCP/IP” connections.

NOTE: IP may also be short for “IP address,” as in “What is your IP?” In this case, IP refers to the unique identifier of a system, not the protocol itself.