Archives : September-2020

Actinium From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Not to be confused with Actin. Actinium, 89Ac Actinium Pronunciation /ækˈtɪniəm/ ​(ak-TIN-ee-əm) Appearance silvery-white, glowing with an eerie blue light;[1] sometimes with a golden cast[2] Mass number [227] Actinium in the periodic table Hydrogen Helium Lithium Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur ..

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Nickel From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article is about the chemical element. For coins known as “nickels” and other uses, see Nickel (disambiguation). Nickel, 28Ni Nickel Appearance lustrous, metallic, and silver with a gold tinge Standard atomic weight Ar, std(Ni) 58.6934(4)[1] Nickel in the periodic table Hydrogen Helium Lithium Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen ..

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Covalent bond From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia   (Redirected from Covalency) Jump to navigationJump to search “Covalent” redirects here. For other uses, see Covalent (disambiguation). This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Find sources: “Covalent bond” – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (June 2020) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) A covalent ..

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Electron capture From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article is about the radioactive decay mode. For the fragmentation method used in mass spectrometry, see Electron capture ionization. For the detector used in gas chromatography, see Electron-capture dissociation. Scheme of two types of electron capture. Top: The nucleus absorbs an electron. Lower left: An outer ..

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Sulfide From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article is about sulfur anion in general. For the organic compound also called sulfide, see thioether. For other uses, see Sulphide (disambiguation). Sulfide Names Systematic IUPAC name Sulfide(2−)[1] (additive), recommended name Sulfanediide (substitutive),[1] not common, rarely used, sometimes generated by automated nomenclature software in organic chemistry Identifiers ..

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Halogen From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article is about the chemical series. For other uses, see Halogen (disambiguation). Halogens Hydrogen Helium Lithium Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon Potassium Calcium Scandium Titanium Vanadium Chromium Manganese Iron Cobalt Nickel Copper Zinc Gallium ..

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Lead From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search This article is about the metal. For other uses, see Lead (disambiguation). Lead, 82Pb Lead Pronunciation /ˈlɛd/ ​(LED) Appearance metallic gray Standard atomic weight Ar, std(Pb) 207.2(1)[1] Lead in the periodic table Hydrogen Helium Lithium Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon ..

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Copper From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). Copper, 29Cu Copper Appearance red-orange metallic luster Standard atomic weight Ar, std(Cu) 63.546(3)[1] Copper in the periodic table Hydrogen Helium Lithium Beryllium Boron Carbon Nitrogen Oxygen Fluorine Neon Sodium Magnesium Aluminium Silicon Phosphorus Sulfur Chlorine Argon Potassium Calcium Scandium Titanium Vanadium Chromium Manganese ..

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Micronutrient From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search Micronutrients are essential elements required by organisms in varying quantities throughout life to orchestrate a range of physiological functions to maintain health.[1][2] Micronutrient requirements differ between organisms; for example, humans and other animals require numerous vitamins and dietary minerals,[3] whereas plants require specific minerals.[4][5] For human nutrition, micronutrient requirements are in amounts generally less than 100 milligrams per ..

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Corrosion From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to navigationJump to search For the Front Line Assembly album, see Corrosion (album). hide v t e Mechanical failure modes Buckling Corrosion Corrosion fatigue Creep Fatigue Fouling Fracture Hydrogen embrittlement Impact Mechanical overload Stress corrosion cracking Thermal shock Wear Yielding Rust, the most familiar example of corrosion Volcanic gases have ..

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